Hat Trick Blog

IT Corner: How to reverse your Windows 10 update

added on Wednesday 4th May 2016 at 11:55am


Tagged: Advice, Help, IT Corner



IT Corner: How to reverse your Windows 10 update
One of the first questions we’re often asked when it comes to upgrading a system is how easily can you go back to your old one if you don’t like it. The answer with Windows 10 is that it's very easy.

Microsoft has built in a simple process that only requires a few clicks to have the system roll back to your previous version of Windows (so long as you haven’t deleted the windows.old folder in which the previous version lives).

  1. Open the "Settings" app / tile
  2. Click on the "Update & Security" option
  3. Click on the "Recovery" option
  4. You should now see a section entitles "Go back to Windows 7"
  5. Click "Get started" and follow the wizard

Windows 10 settings screen


When we tested this helpful feature it successfully took data and installed apps with it, meaning you’re good to go as soon as the process is complete. Of course, as with any operating system installation, you’ll want to make a full backup of your data before you begin either the upgrade or the downgrade. We've heard that the roll-back doesn't always work perfectly, so there is a chance that upgrading and rolling back won't be a seamless process: bear this in mind if you're thinking about upgrading just to see whether you like Windows 10. Again, make a FULL backup beforehand to guard against any problems.

Should I upgrade to Windows 10? Not if you have old software and hardware


One other concern for those moving up to Windows 10, especially from older versions of Windows, is whether their important applications will work on the new OS. For major software releases this will almost certainly be a smooth upgrade, but it’s worth checking with the software provider, as they may still be working on a new version. You don’t want to upgrade and suddenly find you can’t do your normal work on your PC. The same holds true for peripherals such as printers and scanners, which may require the downloading of new drivers to ensure they work properly on the new platform.


This is a guest blog post written by David Thompson who is the current IT Manager for WCF Ltd. David will be writing a monthly article as part of the "IT Corner" column / slot. We hope you find these snippets of IT knowledge useful!